Anne (netmouse) wrote,
Anne
netmouse

various things make a post

A post! a rarity for me these days.

What I'm up to: Kate Stroud was not kidding when she recommended we plan on spending 10-12 hours a day feeding and cleaning the baby. At least I'm getting some interesting viewing done on Netflix and hulu.com while breastfeeding. This past week it was largely Torchwood, Castle, and Lie to Me, but I'm feeling a bit worn on police procedural style things so this week I've also watched Lady Jane, which is about the nine days' queen, and Iris, which is about the novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch.

I find I should now like to read something by Murdoch. If anyone who has read her work has recommendations, please let me know.

Regarding cleaning the baby, highlights from yesterday included working an impressive amount of fuzz and toe jam out from between her toes, which are much bigger and longer than three weeks ago, and marveling at one diaper change that her cloth diaper had somehow shifted up in front such that she got poop in her belly button. Well done, my dear.

As to time on the computer, well, that's a rarity and currently spent both composing things and looking for post-doc opportunities for Brian. So if you want me to know about something, email or call -- I'm not really following Facebook or Livejournal.

I'm working on a poem called The Narfling, an article on how partners can support a breastfeeding new mom, and some book reviews for James Bacon and Chris Garcia, who are putting together a zine full of Hugo recommendations and have asked me to review books by women and minority authors - I'm reviewing Moonshine by Alaya Dawn Johnson, Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal, The One Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (Book 1) by N. K. Jemisin, and, though it's ineligible for the Hugo because it was initially published by booksurge last year, Zetta Elliott's A Wish After Midnight. I'm pretty sure Zetta's eligible for the Campbell and the book deserves the attention - her writing is really good and Wish provides just the sort of perspective and contrast + connection that a time travel book should do.

I ought to include Nnedi Okorafor's Who Fears Death and Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord but I haven't read them yet. I might try to grab copies soon enough for that. It's almost as hard to find time to read books as time on the computer though...

Currently, I'm reading Stones into Schools: promoting peace with books not bombs in Pakistan and Afghanistan by Greg Mortenson. Fascinating book and amazing undertaking to build schools, especially for girls, in these remote places devastated by war and by the 2005 earthquake. Highly recommend that everyone check it out - very uplifting human stories throughout (he manages to make even the tragic somehow uplifting, perhaps because his group is actually responding to it).

Closing quote from Iris Murdoch:

"Perhaps misguided moral passion is better than confused indifference."

(And with that in mind, please VOTE next week!)
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